Blog No.13: A Musical ‘History’ Of Northumberland & Durham – Part 2 – 19th Century – Tracks 10 to 13


The next four tracks of the ‘album’ covering the 19th century – from a Tyne/Wear lover affair to the dawn of the town of Stanley

BLOG NO.13 – IF YOU’D LIKE TO READ BLOG NO.12 FIRST, CLICK HERE.  If you’d like to read first why I wrote these 65 tracks, then click HERE to read that blog. (Blue text are external links, which will open in a new browser window.)

(Those getting this via email won’t be able to see the tracks. Clicking on the title of the blog will open it in a tab of your web browser. For those reading on a iPad, the tracks will open in a separate browser windows and not play on the Page. Apologies.)

Welcome to a blog about tracks 10 to 13 of Part 2. Now comes the blurb if you haven’t read the other Parts…. There are five ‘albums’ (now 66 tracks in all), covering over three hundred years of history – both real and fictional – relating the English northeastern counties of what were Northumberland and Durham, but now Northumberland, Tyne & Wear and Durham including Teesside; Part 2 covers the 19th century. As such, some of the songs are sung in the old Northumbrian, Geordie or Pitmatic accents and dialects. I’ve included explanations of the words used where necessary, and sometimes give lyrics in Standard English.

The dates by the track are either just where I have placed them (e.g. c.1800), this is when the traditional song was written, or this is when the historical event they portray happened. Keep in mind the music styles will change greatly from Parts 1 to 5 as they reflect the time they depict.

If any ex- or working miners out there spot any technical mistakes, please let me know in the comments section at the bottom of the page. If anyone else spots typos, please let me know. Thanks.

Anyone can give a Rate This star rating at the top of the blog or leave a Comment at the bottom of the page, and you can Like this blog if you’re a WordPress member at the bottom. If you’d like each blog to be posted to your inbox, click on the Follow Mak’s Music Blog tab at the top of the sidebar to the right if you’re with WordPress, or FOLLOW (THROUGH EMAIL) if you’re not. Please do rate the tracks in the Poll after them.

I ONLY RECENTLY DISCOVERED THAT YOU CAN’T PLAY THESE TRACKS DIRECTLY ON AN IPAD, AND YOU ARE DIVERTED TO A BROWSER. APOLOGIES FOR THIS, AND I HOPE IT DOESN’T STOP YOU FROM LISTENING TO THEM. I ALSO DISCOVERED THAT THOSE RECEIVING THESE VIA POST CAN’T SEE THE TRACKS AT ALL. APOLOGIES FOR THIS, BUT IT IS BEYOND MY POWERS.

Recorded in Weston Lullingfields & Oswestry, Shropshire © Mak Wilson 1974, 1976, 1977, 1993, 2007 & 2017

Blurb over…now for the tracks….

Track 10 – The Lass Of The Wear – A humorous, tongue-in-cheek look at the rivalry between those from Tyneside (Newcastle area) and those from Wearside (Sunderland area), and the problems this causes for this young couple in a Romeo and Juliet-type love story. This rivalry is ever present between those who support their respective football (soccer) teams.

This one was created purely using loops, not from Apple but Acid.

Dialect words: ‘gannin to’=’going to’; ‘fatha’=’father’; ‘doon’=’down’; ‘Mackems‘=’people from Sunderland and Wearside’; ‘Geordies‘=’people from Newcastle and Tyneside, although it very often gets applied to all those form the Northeast’; ‘got nee money’; ‘got no money’.

Track 11 – Sinking The Shaft – About the extremely dangerous job undertaken by shaft, or pit sinkers. There were untold hazards, from falling to sudden flooding and exploding gas. They could work on one shaft for two years or more, after which they’d up-sticks with their families and move to wherever the next job might be. There’s a great new paperback/ebook out about the pit sinkers of Northumberland and Durham. Click HERE to learn more.

All instruments care of GarageBand and Logic Pro X.

Track 12 – I Fell In Love With A Pit Brow Lass From Ravenglass – A song from a Durham miner who has fallen for a ‘pit brow lass’ from Ravenglass in Cumbria. Pit Brow Lasses cleaned and sorted the coal on the surface, but they were not allowed in Northumberland and  Co. Durham because the Methodists thought it an unseemly job for a woman…that and they wanted to keep them in the kitchen! In the Northeast the job was done by old colliers, or those unfit for work underground, and boys. It was a noisy, dirty and, for the women especially, a dangerous job. As you can see from the image below, they wore shawls, and they sometime got caught in the conveyor belt. Many a Pit Brow Las was either scalped, maimed or killed.

Dialect words: Pit broow=’pit brow’;  divn’t knaa=’don’t know’; owld men=’old men’; marras=’marrows‘=’work mates’; gannin soft in the heed=’going soft in the head’.

All instruments care of GarageBand and Logic Pro X.

Track 13 – Stanley’s Dawn – About the ‘birth’ of the town I grew up in, Stanley. Whilst there had been mining going on for over a century before this story, and there was a small community there before Lord Joicey (a man from Shield Row – where I lived from the age of 9 until leaving home at 16) started sinking the deep shafts in the mid-19th century, it was his work, and other mine owners, that saw the dawn of the Stanley we know today. Before that, Stanley lay to the northeast of the current town, around Hill Top. This is why West Stanley School and West Stanley Colliery were on the east side of the current town. Before this Tanfield was the larger community of the area.

If some locals wonder why I say ‘its church tower now a landmark, seen for many mile around’ and not ‘its church spire now a landmark, seen for many mile around’ – which it is –  it’s because the spire wasn’t added to St. Andrews church until much later.

The name ‘Stanley’ is of Anglo-Saxon origin, meaning ‘stoney clearing‘ or ‘stoney meadow‘, and there are a number of Stanleys around the country. There’s another in Co. Durham, called Stanley Crook to differentiate it.

All instruments in GarageBand and Logic Pro X.

THE END

——————————-

Thanks so much for reading and listening, and please, please, please rate the songs (below) and the blog (at the top)! (Grovelling over.)

Mak

IF YOU’D LIKE TO HAVE A SKIM THROUGH ALL 66 TRACKS, CLICK HERE.

BLOG NO.14 WILL BE PART 4 OF MY CLOSE ENCOUNTERS WITH MUSIC LEGENDS. THIS TIME IT’S ABOUT WORKING ON  THE LEGENDARY MUSICAL FILM, LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS AND BEING IMMORTALISED ON THE TV SHOW FAMILY GUY.

PLEASE RATE THE TRACKS IF YOU HAVE TIME

 

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